Friday, September 24, 2010

News about stink bugs

Washington Post online this afternoon published an article on the effect of stink bugs on both home owners and gardeners/farmers. To read it, CLICK HERE.

Added by Erica:  Also see this news video about stink bugs' effect on one Montgomery County farm, an updated fact sheet from University of Maryland Extension, and a press release from the Maryland Department of Agriculture.

Some good news from Dr. Mike Raupp: he has been observing predation on brown marmorated stink bugs by wheel bugs, spiders and praying mantids.  Check out his site and search under previous Bug of the Week issues to ID these useful predators so you can give them pep talks!

Added by Bob: Here's the hopeful paragraph from the Post article, which, by the way, appears on the front page of the Saturday print edition: "At a USDA lab in Newark, Del., scientists have quarantined tiny parasitic wasps--collected from China and Korea, where they are the bugs' natural predators--to determine whether the wasps can be used against the stink bugs without harming other species here. The wasps attack the eggs of the stink bugs. That research is likely to take two more years."

2 comments:

  1. Are squash bugs the same as stink bugs? I have had success in removing the squash bugs by shaking branches where they are hiding and holding a bucket with a few inches of water underneath. They readily fall to their death since it is their instinct to drop when disturbed.

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  2. Squash bugs and the brown marmorated stink bugs are not the same, but they do have the same habit of dropping toward safety when disturbed. However, when they're on a fruit, say a tomato, rather than on a window screen, they often just dash around the fruit to hide from the threat. When pursued, though, they will drop. This evening, I caught about 50 on our front door screen and a screen on a sliding door--on the inside only! Soapy water in a bowl did them in within seconds of each splash down. As you do, I held the bowl just an inch or two below each invader.

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